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Food Combining – Separate Starches from Proteins

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This week you’ll learn how to properly combine foods for maximum weight loss. The practice of food combining makes every calorie you consume do double duty to help you lose weight. Many people do nothing other than properly combine whole foods to lose weight fast and maintain their goal weight. Food combining is essentially keeping Starches separate from Proteins and eating Fruit at the right time relative to whether you’ve eaten a Starch or Protein meal.

The Basics of Food Combining For Maximum Weight Loss

To give each meal and/or snack the time to thoroughly digest and move through your system without depositing unwanted fat and waste products, you need to allow two and a half hours after a Starch meal/snack before eating a Protein or Fruit meal/snack, and four and a half hours after a Protein meal/snack before eating a Starch or Fruit meal/snack. Veggies, nuts, seeds, and soy are Neutral and may be eaten with any meal or between meals, although I like to wait at least two hours after a meal so that I can have a big beverage before eating anything else.

This means that you will not have a baked potato with your steak, a bun with your hamburger or a tuna sandwich on traditional bread. But it doesn’t mean the end of life as you know it. There are many substitutions you can make to have your hamburger and eat it too – so to speak – which you’ll find on the substitution pages.

Print These Pages

For a list of foods that are Starches, foods that are Neutral and foods that are Proteins, go to the Food List page.

To help you manage your meals print out the List of Substitutions, Protein Substitutes, and Starch Substitutes pages and refer to them when making a meal or recipe that traditionally would be an imperfect combination.

Get out your favorite recipes and rework them so that they don’t contain any incompatible items.

Working With Food Substitutions

Substituting soy products for dairy and meat products will open up your diet by giving you more food choices. For instance, while you shouldn’t have milk on your cereal because you would be combining a Protein with a Starch, you can have nondairy milk on your whole-grain, sugar-free cereal. Nondairy cheese can substitute for dairy cheese in a burrito or a Pizza Sandwich.  Soy “ham” makes a great deli style sandwich on whole grain bread.

One word of caution regarding nondairy cheeses. Some brands taste awful and don’t melt well. Experiment until you find one you like. If you happened to have a Trader Joe’s store near you I think their soy cheese is the best there is. If you want to avoid cheese altogether try using guacamole, slices of avocado or humus in place of cheese.

If you find it difficult to switch cold turkey to nondairy products, begin substituting 1/4 of the dairy or meat in your Starch recipes with soy products. Then try 1/2, then 3/4, then all soy. See Starch Substitutes for more ideas.

A word to those on high-Protein diets; don’t assume that all soy products are completely Neutral. Read the ingredients. You’ll often find grain products which will add to your carb intake. UnDieters on the Basic or Family Plan need not worry about the small amount of grain in these soy products. Typically I use these soy products with Starch and Neutral meals and use meat and dairy products (rather than their soy alternatives) with Protein meals. Vegetarians can however use these soy products with Protein meals.

A note to those allergic to dairy; sometimes you’ll find derivatives of dairy products such as casein which is a milk protein in dairy substitutes. I’ve only found one nondairy cheese that does not contain casein (Soymage), but I don’t like how it tastes or melts. So read carefully and make a  note of those products you like that are good UnDiet substitutes. Tip: so that I don’t have to try and remember or reread the label when making a meal or snack I mark my purchases with a “P” for Protein, “S” for Starch, or “N” for Neutral.

Getting Started with Food Combining

You may not be able to jump right into whole wheat bread and nondairy cheese, but you can structure your meals so that you’re not eating Starches with Proteins. If you’re used to meat and potatoes it will be a bit of a challenge, but if you’re serving some of your favorite veggie dishes instead of potatoes with your Protein meals, and nixing the rolls or using Protein Rolls, you should do okay. If you anticipate lots of objections from your family, start by serving potatoes or their favorite rolls and a veggie dish that they like with your Protein meals. Every now and then eliminate the potatoes or rolls, substituting a Protein Bread or Protein Rolls until you find what satisfies and then you can completely eliminate the potatoes and bread with Protein meals.

Foods like fried chicken which combine Protein and Starch (the bread coating is a Starch) can be easily converted, although if you’re not serving any other Starches with your meal the small amount of flour and bread crumbs used to coat the chicken is fine, as long as they are whole grains. Some great substitutes for the flour coating on any Protein food are:

  • ground sesame seeds
  • ground nuts
  • ground pork rinds
  • Protein Bread crumbs
  • soy flour or a mixture of any of these

Be Prepared For Maximum Success

Using the substitution charts begin constructing a shopping list so you’ll have the ingredients you need to begin making over your favorite meals.
Get out your favorite recipes and rework them so that they don’t contain any incompatible items. Make a list of any items you’ll need to purchase or prepare.
Eating Out While Food Combining

New research showing that our bodies can handle mixing small amounts of Protein and Starch has given us wider margins when constructing meals. The trick is to keep the ratios small. For instance the small amount of flour in a gravy served with a Protein meal or the small amount of breading in meatloaf or meatballs shouldn’t set you back. The trick is to make sure you eat lots of raw Fruits and/or veggies with every meal. It also helps to take an enzyme supplement. I still use soy flour, veggie broth, and ground pork rinds when I make these items at home but this new research gives me more options when I’m eating out.

$$$aver

When making a Protein meal serve larger portions of vegetables and smaller portions of meat and dairy. If you’re used to having meat for most of your dinners, cut back to three or four meat meals per week. Check out the Recipe Index for some satisfying Starch and Neutral meals, and the Meat-less Recipes Index will help you plan meals that contain less meat and therefore cost less.

Step-By-Step

1. Keep Starches separate from Proteins.
2. Print out these pages:

3. Begin making the proper food substitutions.
4. Make a shopping list.
5. Prepare substitute items that you’ll need to prepare meals.
6. Don’t try too many substitutions at once. Take it gradually so you don’t feel overwhelmed or discouraged.
7. To continue receiving your (hopefully by now, treasured) UnDiet Steps each week click on over to PayPal to subscribe.

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Next Issue

A special menu plan filled with UnDiet basic recipes designed to help you prepare foods that are traditionally improper combinations. Once you try the Pasta Alfredo with Bacon, UnDiet Pizza, Crispy Chicken, Bacon Muffins, Maple Walnut Cream Cheese Pie, Meatloaf with Flourless Gravy … you won’t worry about what you’ll be missing with the UnDiet, except of course, all those extra pounds that are already disappearing. All things are possible – with a little ingenuity!

  • Painlessly transition to whole grains.
  • Special recipes released only to Step-By-Step subscribers.
  • How to satisfy (fool) your family when serving them whole wheat and brown rice.
Basic Information

List of Substitutes For Practicing Food Combining

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Some substitutes are perfectly acceptable, others are somewhat acceptable (indicated by italicized type) and therefore should be used only occasionally or if you just must have that particular item (i.e. comfort food, family or peer pressure, having a party …). If there is no entry under a certain column that means that there is no substitute needed for that food group. If an entry spans two or more columns then it works for those two or three food groups.

This page is a full list of all the UnDiet substitutes. If you’re focusing on a Protein Blast or meat free diet you can print out either the Protein Substitutes or Starch Substitutes pages.

Soy products that contain Starches such as grain syrup or food starch are in a small enough amount that if you’re on a vegetarian diet you can safely use them in place of meat in Protein dishes.

Protein

Starch

Neutral

Baked Goods

chocolate

Substitute cocoa powder and a little
butter, or unsweetened chocolate or carob. Adjust the sweetener
to compensate for the loss of sugar that would have been in the semi-sweet
or milk chocolate.

egg

These substitutions don’t work well for cookies, but are great for all
other baked goods.

To reduce fat you can substitute liquid egg, 1/4 cup
= 1 egg
Three egg yolks = one whole egg.

3 tablespoons pureed or well mashed tofu for each egg called
for. It really does work!

flour

Replace white flour with 1/2 the amount of soy flour,
so 1 cup of all purpose flour becomes 1/2 cup soy flour.

Replace 1/4 of the flour with ground nuts, seeds, or ground
dried vegetables.

Replace white flour with sifted whole grain flour, using
1/4 less than the recipe calls for. Tip: oat flour has the lightest taste
and color.
.

sugar

Replace sugar with Stevia, Sucanat, honey,
pure maple syrup, date or maple sugar. Experiment to find the amount that
will satisfy you.

Beverages

beer

. non-alcoholic beer

coffee

. roasted grain beverages decaf

cream instead of milk, half & half or non-dairy creamer

date/maple sugar instead of white sugar or sugar sub.

cola

sparkling water with fresh Fruit juice

wine

dilute with
water (the French do it), sparkling water if you must

Breading & Breadcrumbs

Ground:

  • pork rinds
  • sesame seeds
  • nuts
  • soy flour
  • any mixture of the above
whole grain bread crumbs

whole grain flour

..Ground:

  • sesame seeds
  • nuts
  • soy flour
  • any mixture of the above

Crust for a Dessert

A crust can often be omitted or use one of these
substitutes.

Pastry crust: soy flour pastry crust.

Protein Crepe with sweetener added.

whole wheat pastry

whole wheat tortilla or lavosh coated with butter and/or honey/maple
syrup

Crumb Crust: sugar free whole grain  cookies or graham crackers

Crumb crust: ground nuts with a little soy flour.
.

Crust for an Entree

A crust can often be omitted or use one of these
substitutes.

Rice Crust: soy granules or finely chopped
nuts. You may need to add extra moisture to hold the crust together, you
can add water, softened or melted butter, broth.

Pastry Crust: Protein Crepes, or melt butter in an omelette pan, thinly
coat bottom with egg and cook until done, or Soy Flour Crust.

whole wheat pastry crust

whole wheat tortillas

crumb crust: whole grains, ground nuts or seeds

.

Dairy

.

American, Cheddar, Mozzarella or Jack Cheese

nondairy or real dairy cheese such as rice, almond
or soy cheese
nondairy cheese .soy or almond cheese

condensed milk

Pour 1 cup water and 4 cups soy powder
into a large saucepan. Let sit for 2 hours, then bring
to a boil and boil for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and add (for sweetened
condensed milk 2 cups unrefined
sugar
) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract and 1/4 cup
butter
stirring until dissolved. Makes 1 quart. Store in refrigerator
up to 2 months.

cottage cheese

Mash firm tofu with a fork, add a little heavy
cream.

cream cheese

nondairy cream cheese

farmers cheese/hoop cheese

Mix nondairy cream cheese & roughly
mashed tofu.

milk

soy or almond milk any nondairy milk soy or almond milk

ricotta cheese

. Same as cottage cheese.

yogurt

. nondairy sour cream or nondairy yogurt creme fraiche or clabbered cream

Eggs

Frozen egg substitute tastes great and is
healthy. Make sure that you buy one with no additives.

Two egg whites for one whole egg, except in cookies.

One whole egg and two to three egg whites and you won’t notice any difference
in the taste.

1/4 cup well mashed tofu for each egg 1/4 cup well mashed
tofu for each egg

Sauces

Roux Sauces

soy flour instead of white or wheat flour whole wheat or oat flour instead of white
flour
Add water  to heavy cream  to
sub for milk or half & half or use soymilk.

Tomato Paste Tomato Sauce Tomato Pasta Sauce

Tomato Paste
:
Soak dried tomatoes in medium hot water for an hour – overnight.
Puree using only enough of the soaking liquid to make a thick puree.
Tip: For a shorter soaking time dice the tomatoes before adding
water.

Tomato Sauce: add more liquid.

Pasta Sauce:Add broth, cream, olive oil or combo until sauce
is desired consistency. (Stir in spices.) Allow flavors to meld for
15 – 30 minutes.

Add Dried Tomato Paste or sauce at the end of a recipe so
the tomatoes don’t cook. For a richer flavor add the tomato paste
or sauce and let rest for 15 – 30 minutes. Reheat if necessary,
taking care not to let it boil.

If it’s impossible to add the tomatoes at the end use pureed
roasted red bell peppers instead as they can be cooked.

Vegetables

. .. . .

carrot

tomatoes, yellow or orange bell pepper, fennel,
celery
.. . .

corn

onion, celery, bell pepper .. . .

potato

cauliflower, onion, fennel, jicima (yes it can
be cooked!)
.. . .

tomato

red bell pepper, yellow tomatoes
(they’re less acidic than red tomatoes) or Slow Cooked
Tomatoes
: place cored tomatoes cut in 8-10 wedges
or chunks skin side down on a baking sheet lined with oiled
foil. Bake at 115 degrees for 4-8 hours depending on
how moist you want them.  Check every 60 minutes. Since these take so
long to dry I make 2 full trays & freeze the excess.

winter squash

yellow or orange bell pepper, fennel, cauliflower .. . .
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Detailed List of Foods: Proteins, Starches, Neutrals

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go_undiet1Review your packaged foods with this detailed list. You can filter the list by whatever it is you’re watching in your UnDiet, fiber, sugar, fat, transfats …

This page is designed to educate you as to what food group a particular food belongs in – Neutral, Protein or Starch. Use this list to guide you in planning meals and help you to choose appropriate substitutes.

Starches

Grains

    barley
    brown rice
    buckwheat
    bulgar
    couscous, whole wheat
    kasha
    millet
    rye
    wild rice

Legumes/Beans:

    black beans
    black-eyed peas
    garbanzo beans
    kidney beans
    lentils (come in many colors)
    lima beans
    mung beans
    navy beans
    pinto beans
    split peas

Seeds:

Seeds are best eaten raw as toasting or roasting destroys their digestive enzymes. That said, a toasted pumpkin seed is a wonderful thing to behold. Since seeds are high in calories use them as a garnish rather than eat them by the handful.

    caraway
    poppy
    pumpkin
    sesame
    sunflower

Pasta:

Avoid pasta made with anything other than a whole grain.

    artichoke flour
    brown rice flour
    corn
    buckwheat such as soba noodles
    whole wheat

Cereals:

Look for cereals made with:

    whole grains
    no refined sugars
    chemical-free
    additive-free

Starch Ingredients:

These become starches only when cooked:
Use fresh potatoes. Frozen and dried potato products contain additives which make them difficult to digest. Exceptions can be found in health food stores. corn starch (use browned whole wheat or arrowroot flour instead)

    beets
    carrots
    corn
    fructose (made from corn)
    peas
    potatoes including sweet potatoes & yams
    potato flour
    soy sauce (wheat free can be found in health food stores)

Proteins

Note: the following is one of the more stringent food combining rules – keep each Protein group separate as it takes different digestive juices to digest each group. Honestly, I don’t follow this rule most of the time, but hey – maybe if I did I could lose those last ten excruciating pounds!

Dairy:

Use raw (unpasteurized) dairy products whenever possible. All dairy products contain casein and should be avoided as much as possible.

Cheeses: avoid yellow cheeses if you can, they contain dyes

    cream cheese
    cottage cheese
    farmers cheese
    half & half
    hoop cheese
    kefir
    milk (avoid completely)
    ricotta cheese
    yogurt (avoid completely)

Eggs

Meat

    bacon and sausage – be careful of chemical additives
    fish
    poultry
    red meat
    shell fish

Nuts:

Nuts are a carb/protein mix so limit them and remember that toasting or roasting destroys their digestive enzymes. The list below shows those nuts with the higher protein counts first.
brazil
macademia, pine nuts
almonds, pecans, pumpkin seeds, walnuts
hazelnuts, filberts, peanuts, pistachio
mixed nuts, peanut butter, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
soybeans, cashews
coconut, almond paste

Protein Ingredients:

    gelatin

Neutrals

While vegetables are a carbohydrate they’re considered Neutral and can be eaten with any other food. The only time you need to be aware of vegetables as a carbohydrate is when you’re on an extended (more than one day) Protein Binge.

All vegetables (except Starch Vegetables when cooked)

    agar-agar (gelatin substitute made from seaweed)
    agave nectar
    honey, preferably raw, unfiltered
    maple syrup
    nuts, preferably raw
    soybeans
    soy flour
    soy milk (check label for chemicals or processed sugars)
    soy products (check label)
    soy nuts (check label for chemicals)
    tofu – silken, soft, medium, firm, baked

The predominant element in the foods below is fat. These can be used with both Proteins and Starches as the fat makes them Neutral.

    creme fraiche
    whipping or heavy cream
    butter
Basic Information

Food Pyramid

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The bulk of your food intake should come from the top of this inverted pyramid, adding steps as your taste and lifestyle demand, with the foods at the bottom two layers of the pyramid figuring into your life only occasionally. Click onto each area of the pyramid to move to recipes using that food group.

Print this chart out and tape it to the inside of a kitchen cupboard where you can refer to it easily. If you need a little extra motivation you may want to put it on that most glorious and effective of bulletin boards – the refrigerator.

food pyramid